Simple Lua console in Qt

Lua is a simple, fast and embeddable scripting language. Capability to run Lua scripts can be relatively easily added into C and C++ applications. Due to it’s ease of use and performance it’s being used in computer games (Crysis, Garry’s mod, …), general software (Wireshark, Neovim, …) and also embedded devices (Logic Machine). Let’s take a look how to create a very simple Lua console GUI with Qt.

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Using Azure CI for cross-platform Linux and Windows Qt application builds

Developing cross-platform applications brings some extra challenges. Generally your development machine runs an operating system of your choice, but you need to assure that your application runs on other platforms as well. In the end the only way to do this is to actually test if everything is OK. This hassle can be simplified using CI.

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Simple MQTT temperature sensor

Note: this post was first published on Mevisys website.

In the previous post about monitoring temperature we have used a simple RS-485 connection to communicate with a sensor. While this approach is very simple and has been proven to work well in many applications it can be complicated when the amount of connected sensors increases. Also adding or removing sensors can cause complications.

Modern technologies allow us to connect sensors using existing computer networks. For example the incredible ESP32 SoC can easily be programmed to read data from a sensor and relay them over WiFi using MQTT protocol.

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Environment monitoring using InfluxDB and Grafana

Note: This post was first published on the Mevisys website.

When we talk about environment monitoring, temperature monitoring is one of the most ubiquitous use-cases and makes for an illustrative example as well. The measurement side of the process is not an area that would offer many exciting innovations in this day and age – today it is all about how you process the collected data.

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My first GIT repository

Today I have finally created a repository at GitHub. You can find it at my GitHub profile. This repo contains code for the BLDC motor driver for my diploma thesis, which I mentioned earlier. So far nothing really interesting, but wait for the release of other software and hardware schematics & layouts. As the deadline is just around the corner, it should be ready to release soon enough. I would like to publish it all under a copyleft license (GPL2/3?), but I need to get my university’s approval for that first..

And by the way, GitHub is awesome. If for some reason you didn’t have the opportunity to try it so far, take a look. It’s primary objective is coordination of groups of coders on a project, but can be really useful even for your own project progress tracking and backup.